The Greatest Rock Albums Ever

Heart - Heart

26. Heart - Heart

Finally, a feminine touch to the list. Rock and roll has a serious problem with being overpowered by male voice and male sound, but Heart came onto the scene to prove that women were capable of rocking just as hard.

Heart’s 1985 self-titled album was their eighth, and it contained at least five hit singles that make it one of the greatest rock albums, ever.

Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet

27. Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet

How could we not talk about Bon Jovi and his 1986 album Slippery When Wet? His first two albums really rocked the scene, but with Slippery When Wet, Bon Jovi went for an entirely new rock and roll sound that really became an international hit right away.

After all, this album contained some of his most well-known hits, including Livin’ On a Prayer and Dead or Alive.

Whitesnake - Whitesnake

28. Whitesnake - Whitesnake

The 1980s self-titled album from Whitesnake was a true powerhouse when it came to changing the game for rock and roll. Whitesnake is truly a wild ride from start to finish, including fantastic vocals, unforgettable lyrics, and top-chart hits like Here I Go Again and the unforgettable power ballad, Is This Love.

Def Leppard - Hysteria

29. Def Leppard - Hysteria

Def Leppard’s 1987 album Hysteria is a triumph for a number of reasons, one of which being that the drummer, Rick Allen, was in a car accident and lost his arm before recording began - and after he recovered, Def Leppard went on to record, arguably, their biggest and most successful album. Hysteria is filled to the brim with exciting, heart pumping rock anthems that still stand the test of time today.

Green Day - American Idiot

30. Green Day - American Idiot

Fastforwarding to the early 2000s, Green Day was already had 20 years of success under their belt before the Bush war-era album American Idiot debuted in 2004.

It was what catapulted Green Day into the mainstreet, despite their already successful albums.

American Idiot was a rock opera that spoke to a generation of war-torn young adults in ways that rock music hadn’t quite reached before.